Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need help in helping my assist

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need help in helping my assist

    My assistant shot this from the balcony...she is using a Canon 10D....She is not real knowledgable in Fstops and shutterspeeds, so I set her up in a program mode with mounted flash.


    Most of the images she got were like this....I know there is some camera shake going on, I am not a great teacher, but would like to help her out a bit here.

    oh yes...by the way that is me in the corner with the camera stuck to my cheek.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    here is another....
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      Tell her to HOLD STILL!

      Then set the ISO higher.



      Kirk
      Redheaded Johnson

      Comment


      • #4
        Tracey,

        Get her a tripod. When I did weddings, we NEVER photographed a ceremony in a church WITHOUT a tripod!

        Michael
        I LOVE my lab, H&H!

        Comment


        • #5
          Keyword MONOPOD!! ( at the very least)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Michael J. Plumeyer
            Tracey,

            Get her a tripod. When I did weddings, we NEVER photographed a ceremony in a church WITHOUT a tripod!

            Michael
            Heres your answer!
            Also Pre-set the camera for the assistant! Get that camera off program!
            Once you set the camera, and they are on a tripod there work will be great!

            You will have another problem though they will want a raise!

            Comment


            • #7
              My recomendation is not to let your assistant shoot until she understands f-stop and shutter speed.

              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Fstops and shutterspeeds = exposure

                She shouldn't be shooting unless she at least understands basic exposure and how "Fstops and shutterspeeds" affect the images. I'd give her some homework to read some basic photo how to books. As far as what technique to use to avoid shots looking like the ones here you have a couple of options. You either want her stuff to resemble yours, in which case you show her how to set them up using your preferred method (be it tripod, monopod, higer ISO, faster lens, whatever). Or you want her to develop her own style, in which case you let her do the homework so she understands and then allow her to choose the method she's most comfortable with or at least experiment until she finds one that works. All the while you can be guiding her and answering questions. That way you don't have to be the teacher with all the answers but you can help her fill in the blanks and comprehend what she's reading.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Teach her have her read "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson

                  Great book published in 1990 so no digital just photography.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tracey, Everything said here is correct an assistant who is with you regularly, should progress to learn as much as possible!
                    However I have occasional used an assistant at a wedding, just for an extension of my camera. Example back aisle shots of the brides dad and bride going up and back the aisle, I pre set the camera for them, tell them exactly where and when to take the shots, now remember I also am photographing just from different locations and angles.
                    This can be done and done quite well. BOB

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bob hancock
                      Tracey, Everything said here is correct an assistant who is with you regularly, should progress to learn as much as possible!
                      However I have occasional used an assistant at a wedding, just for an extension of my camera. Example back aisle shots of the brides dad and bride going up and back the aisle, I pre set the camera for them, tell them exactly where and when to take the shots, now remember I also am photographing just from different locations and angles.
                      This can be done and done quite well. BOB
                      That is a good point Bob. I used to do that too. Most often it was in the church. I would set up my other camera with my 300mm or 70-200 lens and aim it at the altar. Exposure was pre-set as was composition. Meanwhile I'd be stalking the front aisles with my 85mm and/or wide angle getting the good shots.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        P is short for professional.
                        The key is a tripod and some basic training!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Professional mode on a tripod, with a cable release without flash works great!

                          Also white balance on the alter or her dress beforehand helps!!!

                          I'll post an image or two later to demonstrate.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hey, Ken Sklute has built a following for his "Sklooty Shake" maybe she is following in his footsteps.

                            I used to pre-meter the ceremony location to review it with my 2nd shooter prior to the ceremony. I then would ask what the boundaries are for handholding and whether they can accomplish it with the equivalent exposures possible with the amount of light. I then let them work out what camera settings they would need to handhold (if possible).

                            Training without practice is pretty much worthless. Keep your assistant shooting but minimize your exposure (pardon the pun) to lawsuits...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not much else to add, Tracey. I do have 3 words for you, actually for her.

                              Practice, Practice, Practice.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X